To prevent the spread of coronavirus, please call ahead before coming to the clinic. See a Connecticut Children’s pediatric specialist from home using your smartphone, tablet or personal computer! Video Visits are available for many appointments and services.

Schedule a Video Visit

Why Choose Connecticut Children’s?

The Numbers Tell the Story

1 EOS X-ray in Hartford
1,500 Surgeries Annually
15-30% Injuries to Growth Plates
32,000 Patient Visits Annually

Our orthopedic and sports medicine specialists care for thousands of young adults, teens and children every year, each experiencing exceptional treatment and outcomes.

Highly Qualified Team That Understands Pediatric Fractures

When your child sees us for immediate care, we offer a unique pediatric-centered perspective and services you won’t find anywhere else in Connecticut.

Learn More

Treatment Tailored to Growing Teens and Kids

Our EOS X-ray machine in Hartford is an ultra-low-dose, 3D imaging system that uses two to three times less radiation than conventional machines while still producing high-quality, detailed images.

Learn More

Comprehensive Expertise and Experience

We understand that being happy with your care is just as important as clinical experience and expertise. That’s why we care for your teen or child with the same compassion, attentiveness and concern as we would a member of our own family.

Learn More

Swift Care for Your Teen’s or Child’s Fractures

Teens’ and children’s ligaments are stronger than their bones. As a result, they’re more likely to suffer broken bones from the kinds of injuries that would generally lead to sprains or ligament tears in adults.

All fractures fall into two categories: compound and simple. Compound fractures penetrate the skin, exposing the bone and deep tissues. Simple fractures remain inside the body — making them more difficult to diagnose without an X-ray or computed tomography (CT) scan.

It’s vital your child sees us immediately if they’ve broken a bone so they can begin treatment right away. Broken bone symptoms include:

  • A crooked arm or leg
  • Inflammation (swelling)
  • Persistent pain

What is the Difference between Strains and Sprains

Muscles contract and relax (almost like rubber bands) to help your body move. So a strain is exactly what it sounds like: a muscle or tendon (tissue that attaches muscle to bone) that has been stretched too far. It’s common for people to strain the muscles in their backs, necks, or legs.

Bones meet at joints, such as elbows, knees, or shoulders. That’s where your body bends and rotates. Strong, elastic bands of tissue called ligaments hold bones together in the joints. A sprain happens when those ligaments have been overstretched (mild sprain) or torn (severe sprain). Ankles, wrists, and knees sprain easily. Sprains are common injuries, especially among active older kids and teens who play sports.

Our team can examine and diagnose your child’s condition during our walk-in hours, providing your child with fast, expert treatment.

Address Your Teen’s or Child’s Movement Restrictions

If your teen or child suddenly has trouble walking that’s associated with pain or discomfort, there’s a great chance they have sustained an injury, such as a sprain or broken bone. Our pediatric experts can provide you and your teen or child peace of mind during walk-in times by:

  • Discussing your child’s symptoms
  • Performing any necessary imaging tests
  • Prescribing the best possible treatment
  • Broken Bones

    Swift Care for Your Teen’s or Child’s Fractures

    Teens’ and children’s ligaments are stronger than their bones. As a result, they’re more likely to suffer broken bones from the kinds of injuries that would generally lead to sprains or ligament tears in adults.

    All fractures fall into two categories: compound and simple. Compound fractures penetrate the skin, exposing the bone and deep tissues. Simple fractures remain inside the body — making them more difficult to diagnose without an X-ray or computed tomography (CT) scan.

    It’s vital your child sees us immediately if they’ve broken a bone so they can begin treatment right away. Broken bone symptoms include:

    • A crooked arm or leg
    • Inflammation (swelling)
    • Persistent pain
  • Strains, Sprains & Pains

    What is the Difference between Strains and Sprains

    Muscles contract and relax (almost like rubber bands) to help your body move. So a strain is exactly what it sounds like: a muscle or tendon (tissue that attaches muscle to bone) that has been stretched too far. It’s common for people to strain the muscles in their backs, necks, or legs.

    Bones meet at joints, such as elbows, knees, or shoulders. That’s where your body bends and rotates. Strong, elastic bands of tissue called ligaments hold bones together in the joints. A sprain happens when those ligaments have been overstretched (mild sprain) or torn (severe sprain). Ankles, wrists, and knees sprain easily. Sprains are common injuries, especially among active older kids and teens who play sports.

    Our team can examine and diagnose your child’s condition during our walk-in hours, providing your child with fast, expert treatment.

  • Difficulty Walking

    Address Your Teen’s or Child’s Movement Restrictions

    If your teen or child suddenly has trouble walking that’s associated with pain or discomfort, there’s a great chance they have sustained an injury, such as a sprain or broken bone. Our pediatric experts can provide you and your teen or child peace of mind during walk-in times by:

    • Discussing your child’s symptoms
    • Performing any necessary imaging tests
    • Prescribing the best possible treatment

Jeffrey Thomson, MD

Dr. Jeffrey Thomson’s practice focuses on spinal deformity in children (scoliosis), myelomeningocele (spina bifida), neuromuscular disorders, clubfeet and other foot abnormalities, and children’s fractures. He also treats children’s hip disorders such as hip dysplasia and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Dr. Thomson’s research interests include scoliosis and spinal deformity, spina bifida, gait disorders and clubfeet.

He is a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. His is a member of the Scoliosis Research Society, Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America, and the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. Dr. Thomson is the director of orthopedic surgery and vice president of Connecticut Children’s medical staff.

MEET DR. THOMSON >

Jeffrey Thomson, MD

Dr. Jeffrey Thomson’s practice focuses on spinal deformity in children (scoliosis), myelomeningocele (spina bifida), neuromuscular disorders, clubfeet and other foot abnormalities, and children’s fractures. He also treats children’s hip disorders such as hip dysplasia and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Dr. Thomson’s research interests include scoliosis and spinal deformity, spina bifida, gait disorders and clubfeet.

He is a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. His is a member of the Scoliosis Research Society, Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America, and the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. Dr. Thomson is the director of orthopedic surgery and vice president of Connecticut Children’s medical staff.

MEET DR. THOMSON >

Our Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Providers

Dr. Jeff Thomson
Jeffrey Thomson, MD
Division Head, Orthopedics
Dr. Wang headshot
David Wang, MD, MS
Clinical Director, Elite Sports Medicine
Dr. Sonia Chaudhry
Sonia Chaudhry, MD
Orthopedics
Allison Elizabeth Crepeau, MD
Elite Sports Medicine
Dr. Hafeez headshot
Imran Hafeez, MD
Elite Sports Medicine
Dr. Katsman
Anna Katsman, MD
Orthopedics
Dr. Mark Lee
Mark C. Lee, MD
Orthopedics
Dr. Philip Mack
Philip W. Mack, MD
Orthopedics
Dr. Kristan Pierz
Kristan Pierz, MD
Orthopedics
Dr. Pace headshot
James Lee Pace, MD
Elite Sports Medicine
Dr. Rieger
Mark A Rieger, MD
Orthopedics
Dr. Janet Zahradnik
Janet Zahradnik, MD
Orthopedics
Nicole Chevalier, PA-C
Elite Sports Medicine
Katelyn Colosi, MHS PA-C
Elite Sports Medicine
Kevin Connolly, PA-C
Orthopedics
Kevin Fitzsimmons, MHS PA-C
Elite Sports Medicine
Sarah Florence, PA-C
Orthopedics
Marta Jablonski, PA-C
Orthopedics
Anthony J. Ricciuti, Jr., PA-C
Elite Sports Medicine

Our Walk-In Locations

Orthopedic Main Office – Hartford
31 Seymour Street, 4th Floor
Hartford, CT, 06106

Get Directions
specialty care center farmington building
Sports Medicine & Orthopedics – Farmington
399 Farmington Ave.
Farmington, CT, 06032

Get Directions
Glastonbury specialty care center building
Specialty Care Center – Glastonbury
310 Western Blvd.
Glastonbury, CT, 06033

Get Directions

Get the Best Care Right When Your Family Needs It

Teens and children require specialized needs for bone and muscle care that only top-qualified sports medicine and orthopedic specialists can provide. With our walk-in access and same-day appointments, you can now visit our orthopedic specialist in our Hartford office and our sports medicine and orthopedic specialist in our Farmington office for immediate care.

We know active teens and kids hit their goals — and ground — hard. Between 15% and 30% of children’s fractures are accompanied by an injury to a growth plate, the weakest part of the skeletal system during adolescence and childhood. Our highly qualified team understands how to best treat such fractures — so you don’t have to worry about your teen’s or child’s treatment plan interfering with their growth.

Our experts provide your teen or child with the best orthopedic pediatric care right after sustaining an injury — whether a broken bone or sprain — from participating in sports, enjoying recreational activities or playing outside.

And when your child sees us for immediate care, we offer a unique pediatric-centered perspective and services you won’t find anywhere else in Connecticut, including:

  • Connecticut Children’s pediatric hand surgeon, Sonia Chaudhry, MD, who exclusively treats children
  • One of only seven facilities nationwide featuring an EOS imaging system, providing low-dose radiology images in our Hartford office

Our collaborative approach integrates the latest technology, innovation and research to produce the most accurate diagnoses and the best possible outcomes — helping us fulfill our mission to keep teens and kids moving so they can focus on living their normal, active lives.

As a Level 1 Trauma Center, we have performed more than 1,500 orthopedic surgeries and completed 32,000 patient visits this year alone. We look forward to serving your family right when you need us most.

Treatment Tailored to Growing Teens and Kids

Unlike adult orthopedic departments, we use radiology equipment that emits as little radiation as possible. This ensures your teen’s or child’s safety — especially if your teen or child has a condition requiring repeated imaging for treatment, such as certain types of fractures and conditions.

Our EOS X-ray machine in Hartford is an ultra-low-dose, 3D imaging system that uses two to three times less radiation than conventional machines while still producing high-quality, detailed images. It can scan your teen or child sitting or standing — the optimal position for showing their natural, weight-bearing posture to most accurately assess the interaction between the joints and the rest of the musculoskeletal system, particularly the spine. We are the only facility in Connecticut, and one of seven in the country, to feature an EOS imaging system. Connecticut Children’s also recently installed a 3T MRI Scanner which provides more sophisticated imaging procedures with more accurate diagnosis.

Comprehensive Expertise and Experience

At Connecticut Children’s, our board-certified, fellowship-trained orthopedic and sports medicine surgeons are experts at treating all sorts of orthopedic conditions unique to infants, children and teens. And with 32,000 pediatric patient visits and more than 1,500 surgeries a year, we are among the most experienced team in the state.

We understand that being happy with your care is just as important as clinical experience and expertise. That’s why we care for your teen or child with the same compassion, attentiveness and concern as we would a member of our own family.